Tag Archives: peaches

coconut + raspberry + spring peach freezer pops

Is it possible to still be jet lagged after a week of being back home? If not, I must be the exception to the rule. Last week, at this very moment, I was flying over Kansas, making my way back to Denver from the most memorable and exciting trip I think I have ever had. I spent a week in the Burgundy region of France and made the towns of Dijon and Mâcon my home for much too short of a visit. I ate, drank, photographed, walked, explored, documented, and relished all that France had to offer, during the limited time I was there.

The trip was thought-provoking, paradigm-shifting, life-changing…what else can I add to this train of hyphenated descriptors? Joking aside, I did come back changed. And not just circumstantially changed, as if change were a byproduct of my experiences. I was intentionally and purposefully changed. If you let it, travel can open your eyes to compelling sights, contrasting cultures, and different means of thought. It can also focus and open your eyes upon yourself: how you think in a completely different context, why you act the way you do, how you react when out of your element, who you truly want to be, and why you care so much about what people think. And why you deem others’ opinions so important.

As I sit here this late afternoon, poring over my notes and tweaking hundreds of photos, while the rain pitter-patters outside my window, I am reminding myself of how free I felt overseas. How alive and observant I became. How intensely focused upon my senses I was. Why do we so frequently become complacent in our daily lives and routines? Why is it that we so often need a big change or slap in the face to make us see things differently?

I didn’t speak French, save the seven or so pertinent phrases I taught myself on the flight over {thank you, SpeakEasy French app!}. Despite the language barrier, I let myself open up to chance, meeting interesting people along the way, finding myself in unfamiliar circumstances, and forcing myself to react the way I wanted to. I slowed my pace, I listened more, I tasted with intention, and, eventually, I sighed deeper than I’d sighed in months. I wanted to take this feeling home with me and perpetuate it. Live it.

Greeted with a severe case of exhaustion from a delayed flight, a lengthy layover and an immediate reentry to my job, I quickly, but temporarily, lost my post-vacation buzz. I am finally feeling more refreshed today. Memorial Day was filled with bustle for us. We visited the garden center and purchased replacement plants for our garden. A recent hail storm decimated most of our newly planted seedlings. We pouted for a short moment, dealt with our sense of no control, and chose to replant, even if it costs us a bit more money. What more can you do? The trip to the garden center revived our excitement, and we came home ready to fill the backyard with veggies and herbs.

All of that hard work made us thirsty for something sweet and refreshing. A quick peek on Instagram at Fork Knife Swoon‘s photo of creamy coconut and blood orange ice pops propelled me to the grocery to grab some fruit and make my own. These turned out pretty darned delicious and were super easy to create. Another lesson on taking the time to make and enjoy something beautiful and satisfying. Thank you, France, for the much-needed tutorial on those subjects.


Coconut + Raspberry + Spring Peach Freezer Pops


  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 peaches, sliced
  • 1 heaping cup raspberries
  • 1/8 cup agave nectar {sweeten to taste}

In a mixing bowl, whisk coconut milk, vanilla, and agave nectar until incorporated and creamy. Set aside. In a blender {I used my trusty Vitamix}, purée the sliced and pitted peaches until smooth. There is no need to remove the skins. Set the peach mixture aside. Separately purée the raspberries until smooth and set aside. I had to add a little water to the berries to get the action going. You may also use frozen fruit, if you do not have fresh fruit at your fingertips.

For a creamy freezer pop, as Laura suggests, combine all of the ingredients until incorporated and divide evenly into six molds. I chose to layer my three components for a striking presentation, but I think I will combine them all next time, for a smoother and less icy consistency. Evenly pour the coconut milk into the molds and place them in the freezer for 10 minutes. Slowly pour the peach mixture next, followed by the raspberry mixture. I used a chopstick to drag some of the color down to the bottom of the mold, where the coconut milk was resting. Freeze for another 30 minutes and then add the stick or top of the mold. After 4 more hours of freezing, my 6 pops were ready.

These fruity freezer pops turned out to be the most delicious part of our day, along with reviving our vegetable and herb garden. We eventually graduated to a more adult form of celebration and drove down to my favorite wine shop, Divino. We found a couple of gems, and cracked a bottle of Richard Betts’ newest wine, “My Essential” Rosé. Refreshing, crisp, and satisfying. It was an essential component to a very memorable Memorial Day.


Richard Betts’ “My Essential” Rosé, Grenache, Provence, France 2013


  • On the eyes – a delicate kiss of pale salmon.
  • On the nose – floral, freshly picked red berries.
  • On the palate – dry, crisp, lean, with racy acidity and balanced fruit.
  • On the table – enjoy alone or with a friend, in the garden or on the porch, with some chèvre or simply solo.
  • On the shelf – about $13.
  • On the ears – paired with Empire of the Sun’s “Alive” from their album, Ice on the Dune. This song seriously makes me happy and makes me feel, aptly, more alive. “Loving every minute, ’cause you make me feel so alive. Alive.” That’s pretty much how Memorial Day went down this year, with so much gratitude.

peach sage galettes | paired with bellinis

…because summer is such a hard habit to break!

Fare thee well, summer, but just before I officially express my sorrow, concerning your all too soon departure, I think I will sit and savor the lingering ripe peaches you’ve recently sent my way.  You’d better cue the music.  I picked up about ten last-of-the-season peaches from the farmer’s market a couple weeks ago.  They were harvested a little early and tasted a bit under-ripe, but with a little bubbles-inspired creativity on a chilly afternoon, some magic happened.  And I know it has been a while since I last posted, but I’ve got some pretty good excuses for my absence…

Proudly grown by Ela Family Farms, these peaches hail from Hotchkiss, Colorado.  The almost ripe peaches actually gave the galette a firmer texture, a blessing in disguise.  Riding Colorado’s proverbial fall mood swing, along with our trending weather patterns, I have found myself vacillating between wearing sandals and thumbing fashion magazines for riding boots.  Making sangria and dreaming of pumpkin spice lattes.  Sunning on the back porch and selecting yarn for my next chunky scarf.   Our garden has also been in what I’ll call an “indecisive panic mode” for about two weeks now.  An early fall frost sent our red, ripe tomatoes directly off the vine and into the Vitamix, but our late plantings of radishes, arugula, and parsley are still thriving.  This particular recipe bridges the gap between that slow, lazy sweetness of summer and invites the cozy, spiced warmth of fall.

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What exactly is a galette?  It is basically a free-form tart or pie.  Widely used in French cooking, galettes provide a rustic, crisp crust and are much less pretentious than a formal tart.  Don’t fret that you won’t be able to bake this simple, rustic galette because peach season has ended.  Substitute fresh peaches with other stone-fruits, pears, apples, or berries that are in season right now.  Galettes can also be prepared sweet or savory; I am going to tinker around with a chanterelle and caramelized onion version this week, since I happen to have some leftover mushrooms from my recent trip to Oregon.

Peach Sage Galette

Ingredients for the filling:

  • 4 to 5 yellow peaches, pitted, and sliced [slightly under-ripe, if possible]
  • juice of one lemon
  • 2 teaspoons good quality vanilla extract
  • 1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped, fresh sage
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons raw sugar
  • lemon zest for garnish [optional}

Ingredients for the crust {yields two crusts}:

  • 2 cups  flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter, cold and cubed
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 3 tablespoons cold milk
  • 1 egg, beaten, for brushing the crust
  • 1 tablespoon raw sugar, for garnish

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine the pitted, sliced peaches, lemon juice, vanilla extract, sage, and raw sugar.  Set aside.
  3. In a separate mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt.
  4. Pour into a food processor.
  5. Add the cubed butter and “pulse” the processor, until 1/4″ sized lumps of butter are visible.
  6. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and milk.  Add to the flour mixture and pulse just until incorporated.
  7. Remove dough from the processor and form into a ball.  Divide into two balls; this recipe yields two crusts.  Bonus!
  8. Store in refrigerator until needed, or you may safely freeze the other ball of pie crust until your next project.
  9. When ready to roll out the dough, set out a large sheet of waxed or parchment paper and lightly flour the surface.  I like to roll my dough on floured paper because I have more control, when lifting it onto the baking sheet.
  10. Set the ball of dough on the floured paper.  Roll and press the dough to form about a 12-inch circle.  You can always alter the size or quantity of these galettes.  Do not over-knead.
  11. Using your hand or a flat spatula, slide under the waxed paper and lift.
  12. Flip the dough-side down onto a floured, rimmed baking sheet.  Carefully lift the wax paper off the rolled-out dough.
  13. Spoon the peach filling onto the center of the dough and carefully fold the outer edges of the dough, overlapping along the way.  Garnish with lemon zest.
  14. Brush the exposed dough with the beaten egg and sprinkle raw sugar over the crust.
  15. Place  in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until the crust is browned.  I actually took a propane torch and caramelized the exposed fruit and browned the crust a little further.
  16. Let cool for at least ten minutes and garnish with some vanilla bean ice cream.

Notes:  You may make the crust ahead of time and keep refrigerated.  This particular dough recipe yields two crusts – one for now and one to freeze for later.  I use this versatile dough recipe for my pies and for quiches.  The frozen crust will keep in the freezer up to two months, if stored properly.  If you feel a little lazy or are short on time, a store-bought 9-inch pie crust will substitute nicely.

Yes, as a household, we are still awaiting the delivery of our counter tops.  Until our kitchen renovation is completed, we continue to employ our outdoor grill, the bathtub, and the camping stove as functional appliance substitutes.  In fact, I made this peach galette entirely on the back porch, baking it in our outdoor Weber grill; however, I have adapted this recipe for those of you, who have an actual ovens in your kitchens!  Goes to show that with some Pollyanna-inspired ingenuity, good things can happen.

Always seeking out a cocktail or wine pairing opportunity, I actually found the inspiration for a simple cocktail, while rummaging in my refrigerator door.  Prosecco and peaches are a classic combination:  bellinis are comprised simply of peach purée and a healthy dose of the aforementioned sparkling wine from Italy.  How to make this refreshing, bubbly treat?  Take one pitted peach and blend it until smooth.  Don’t even bother peeling it.  Depending upon the peach’s ripeness, add a little agave nectar or a squeeze of lemon to balance the acidity.  Spoon a dollop of the purée into a martini glass or Champagne flute and slowly top with dry bubbly, like Mionetto Prosecco.  I garnished my bellini with a freshly picked pineapple sage leaf.  Gently squeeze the sage leaf in your hands to further release the aroma.

I am closing with some snapshots of the garden before last weekend’s freeze.  In one afternoon, the previous months of bounty aside, we harvested almost 200 tomatoes, 6 acorn squashes, over 100 peppers, 50 tomatillos, along with one amazing cantaloupe, a head of red cabbage, one giant Blue Hubbard squash, and too many herbs to dry at once.  I am gearing up to make some green tomato chutney this afternoon, before heading in for work.  And after enjoying two consecutive days off, I can say that I feel fully rested and ready to tackle almost anything.  Over the past three weeks, I have either been studying for my level two sommelier certification exam with the Court of Master Sommeliers, creating and crafting juice “mocktails” for a farm dinner, or stomping grapes and making wine for a week in Oregon.  More on those adventures soon.  So ready for a slower paced fall.  Way too ready for another peach bellini!

peach + mint mojitos

I am realizing that if I wait for the “perfect” time to sit down and compose a post {or do anything, for that matter}, that moment may never happen.  Well, here I am – another cocktail post, and another day closer to a finished kitchen!  The kitchen is still unusable, so that means donating surplus vegetables to friends, still washing dishes in the bathroom sink, and striving to make the fastest and easiest-to-clean-up summer treats.  We have done a lot of eating out lately, and I am actually ready for a full-on cleanse of some sort very soon.  I have found that simply selecting a glass, grabbing my muddler, and making a trip to the garden or the store have made some of the most delicious summer cocktail moments of the summer…nice respites in the midst of some serious chaos.

Ingredients for the It’s All Just Peachy Mojito

  • 1 peach, pitted, and sliced (into, maybe, ten pieces)
  • juice from one lime
  • handful of fresh mint leaves
  • 1-2 teaspoons raw sugar
  • 1.5 ounces rum (spiced or white – I used 10 Cane, one of my favorites)
  • club soda

Steps for making the It’s All Just Peachy Mojito

  1. In a mixing tin, muddle the peach slices, lime juice, raw sugar, and mint leaves.
  2. Pour in rum and a few ice cubes.
  3. Shake the tin to incorporate.
  4. Pour into a tall or “collins” glass.
  5. Top with more ice.
  6. Finish with soda water.
  7. Garnish with a sprig of fresh mint.
  8. Sit back, deeply sigh, think of something you’re grateful for, and take a long, slow sip.

The spearmint and peppermint were sourced from the backyard garden today, and the peaches were picked a day ago in Palisade, Colorado, where the peaches are in season.  I love the fruit from Ela Family Farms; I have been enjoying their produce for several years, here in Colorado.  If you need to find a farmers’ market or a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program in your state, check out Local Harvest.  I found the very first CSA I subscribed to, back in 2008, on this very website.  My life was never the same.

So many bartenders and mixologists deride mojitos and other muddled drinks because of their cumbersome nature, when, in fact, these drinks have so much flavor and character!  Bring on the muddling and get rid of some pent-up stress!  Speaking of ridding oneself of stresses, we finished laying the floor tile in the kitchen this afternoon.  The process took over six hours.  Tomorrow, we grout and clean up the excess mortar.  I am beyond excited!!!  I just realized that I have never taken a photo from or of my kitchen for this blog; I would always shoot outside or seriously crop.  A detailed before-and-after post in the near future is necessary for some perspective.  Closing with some shots from this week’s garden and tonight’s kitchen…

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how to preserve peaches in the freezer

The end of summer in Colorado is signaled by the arrival of peaches from the western slope.  These peaches from Pallisade, Colorado are among the sweetest around, in my opinion, only to be rivaled with those from Georgia.  This year, Pallisade peaches ripened about two weeks earlier than last year, due to our heat wave we have experienced this summer.  I don’t mind the earlier delivery date; I will take these sweet stone fruits any time of year!

Fresh peaches from Pallisade, Colorado, sliced, served with Greek yogurt, drizzled with honey, and tossed with toasted pecans.

I make sure that I am not only able to enjoy these peaches at their peak ripeness now, but I am also able to enjoy them during the winter months by simply canning them, making jam or preserves, and freezing them.  I had attempted freezing peaches, and I must have improperly frozen them because I experienced freezer burn.  With a little research, I decided to give freezing peaches another try.  I obtain so much useful information from pickyourown.org.  This site offers advice on preservation techniques, as well as recipes to utilize your preserved bounty.

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