Tag Archives: frozen desserts

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | #popsicleweek

Happy Popsicle Week!

There are only a couple more days of this official celebration of all-things-frozen-and-delicious, hosted by the creative and affable, Billy of Wit & Vinegar. This is year two of his popsicle round-up, featuring a lineup of insanely creative recipes from bloggers across the interwebs. This exhaustive list will keep you inspired and glued to your popsicle mold well into early fall.

I’ve been making some sort of fruity popsicle, since I was five. I owe any popsicle prowess to my mom. She kept it simple and would freeze our Juicy Juice in the most adorable, kid-sized Tupperware molds. I wish I still had them. I’ve since moved on to a little more “involved” popsicle, adding whole fruits, coconut milk, nuts, and even edible flowers to the mix. This summer, however, was the first time I thought of adding a little extra kick: rosé!

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraAround our house, with two sommeliers in the kitchen, these boozy popsicles are affectionately known as “somm pops.” I think we’d imbibed a tad too much wine one evening, when we came up with the title. We ended up sketching plans for a recipe book, featuring popsicles made with wine, perfectly paired with their other ingredients. The next morning, the whole idea sounded ridiculous, but I’m still rocking their new name!

Keep in mind that booze doesn’t freeze as solidly as water or juice does. In fact, these particular pops melt kind of quickly, if you’re standing in the hot, summer sun. I wouldn’t decrease the amount of rosé in the recipe, however. The whole point is to enjoy a delicious, frozen, sangria-like concoction on a stick. I kept mine chilling in an iced wine bucket, and they didn’t melt as fast. You’ll notice a darker color at the top of these popsicles. I added a little blackberry liqueur, just before I froze the pops. I will most likely omit this on my next recipe, since the liqueur melted almost instantly. It made for a beautiful color, though.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora


strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | somm pops


  • 10 ounces dry rosé {I went with Lorenza rosé}
  • 7 ounces watermelon juice
  • 1 ounce blood orange liqueur {I used Solerno}
  • 1 ounce agave nectar
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 6-7 sliced strawberries
  1. Chill down your rosé, so you’ll have something to sip on, while you make your pops.
  2. Juice your watermelon. I used my Hurom juicer, but you can also simply blend watermelon chucks and then pour the juice through a fine-mesh strainer to remove any particulates.
  3. In a bowl, combine the rosé, the freshly juiced watermelon, orange liqueur, agave nectar, and lime juice. Whisk well to incorporate.
  4. Place two or three sliced strawberries into each popsicle mold and pour the rosé mixture on top, leaving about 1/4″ space at the top, so the liquid has room to expand.
  5. Add your popsicle sticks and freeze at least three hours or until solid.
  • This recipe makes ten popsicles. I used the Prepworks mold, sold on Amazon.
  • Remember, these are boooooozy pops, so they will melt faster. That’s not exactly a bad thing, when you want a light, summery buzz. You just have to enjoy them quicker.
  • Substitute any other berries you have on hand. Raspberries would be divine here.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraSo, I can’t leave out a tasting note on the Lorenza rosé. It has been one of my favorite pink wines this summer. In fact, I picked up an entire case, and I’m up for another one soon. Lorenza is crafted by a lovely mother and daughter duo, Melinda Kearney and Michèle Lorenza Ouellet. Their wine is crisp, dry, delicate, and delicious. The aromas and flavors in this rosé were a perfect match for the strawberries and watermelon in the popsicles.


lorenza rosé, california, 2014


  • On the eyes  –  It’s a brilliant, pale peach.
  • On the nose  –  Slightly under-ripened strawberry, quince, and pear, with light, floral aromas.
  • In the blend  –  44% Grenache, 33% Carignan, 15% Mourvèdre, 8% Cinsault.
  • On the palate  –  This rosé is dry and crisp with a racy, mouthwatering acidity. Lean and light in body, Lorenza still has an almost satin-like mouth-feel, supplied by the rich fruit on the palate. Lots of strawberries with a clean, mineral-driven, balanced finish. More, please.
  • On the table  –  I loved pairing this rosé with a watermelon caprese salad. The acidity in the wine was a perfect complement to the fresh mozzarella. Rosé isn’t only for delicate food presentations, either. Enjoy this wine with briny oysters, any summer salads, or, one of my favorites, a veggie burger with ample amounts of avocado.
  • On the shelf  –  Find it for around $19.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraWhat kind of popsicles are you making this summer? If you haven’t made any yet, here are a few other boozy pops I’m definitely going to try over the next few weeks. Whether you call them “poptails,” “cocktail pops,” or “somm pops,” get out and make yourself some!

I’ll add a little catch-up on the happenings from the garden this past week. It has been super hot and toasty with little rain, so I have had to water a little more frequently. No watering was necessary in June, but it is definitely the stereotypical summer now. Full-on heat and sunshine. And the new “secret garden” that we build along the side of our detached garage is seriously taking off. I’m so glad we turned a formerly fenced-in waste of space into an eye-catching and engaging edible growing area.

Happiest of weekends to you!

Jayme

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraCheers!!

two bowls of sherbet on a cutting board

blood orange + campari sherbet {vegan}

I’ve been in a seasonal slump lately. It’s definitely a product of the cold weather and shorter days. I’m doing all the usual advice, like getting up earlier, going outside for some Vitamin D, lighting candles at night, and listening to cheery music. I’ve also been filling up my kitchen with bowls of lemons, oranges, and limes. I will say that their pungent aromas and punchy colors do pick me up quite a bit. The fact that citrus season falls in mid-winter is kind of like a love letter from nature, letting me know that longer days, warmer weather, and summer are on their way.

My citrus obsession has led to a lot of fun experimenting with different recipes and means of preserving these prime winter fruits. I’ve dabbled with lemon curd, preserved  lemons, and a few versions of citrus salads. I even managed to make a tangy orange marmalade, despite the fact that I let the preserving pot boil over. Cleanup was not fun. Not too proud about that moment. And then I came across a recipe for orange sherbet, via the Brown-Eyed Baker.

Right then, I knew exactly what I was going to do with my last basketful of blood oranges.

And if I accidentally type the word, sherbert, instead of sherbet, please don’t scold. Does anyone else feel the need to add the “r” to the word? I don’t know if it is a southern thing or just an accidental pronunciation that caught on, but I still slip up and add the “r.” I suppose worse things could happen, right?

overhead view of blood orange sherbet with orange slices blood orange sherbet with orange slicesNo, I am not 100% vegan, yet. I do, however, consume copious amount of veggies and eschew products that promote animal cruelty. I have slowly been reducing the amount of dairy in my recipes and meals. Giving up cheese has proven to be a futile effort, since the likes of Manchego, the Drunken Goat, and anything Haystack Mountain permanently reside in my refrigerator. It is always tougher to avoid your favorite foods, if your housemate isn’t on board with you. I blame Steve.

Dirty confession? I have wound up on the floor of my kitchen, at some ungodly hour of the night, either shoveling cheese and crackers into my mouth or cutting to the chase and eating a slab of the stuff, like you would a chocolate bar. It’s my vice, my current addiction. It will be the last animal product to go, if/when I do commit to the vegan lifestyle.

Vegan or not, I swear you’ll go crazy for this sherbet. It has just the right about of creamy texture, fruity sweetness, and tart-y punch. The best part about this recipe? You don’t even need an ice cream maker. David Lebovitz told me so.

close-up of spoonful of sherbet overhead view of sherbet and flowered towel


blood orange + campari sherbet {vegan}


  • 1 tablespoon blood orange zest
  • 1 cup cane sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 cups blood orange juice {about 5 oranges}
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons Campari
  • 2/3 cup coconut cream {see notes}
  1. Wash and zest your blood oranges, until you have a firmly packed tablespoon of zest. I used my new Microplane zester that my mom sent me. It is amazing.
  2. In a food processor, combine zest with sugar and salt. Pulse until the zest is well-distributed and mixture is slightly damp.
  3. In a juicer, juice five or six oranges, until you have 2 cups of liquid. If you don’t have a juicer, you can peel and purée the oranges in a blender and run them through a sieve, if you’d like.
  4. Add the blood orange juice, lemon juice {I used a hand-squeezer for this small amount}, vanilla extract, and Campari to the sugar mix. Process for about a minute or until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  5. In a blender, whip the coconut cream until light and airy. How do you make the coconut cream? This is the best tutorial I’ve found.
  6. Add the coconut cream to the mixture and pulse until incorporated. See bullet below on how to obtain coconut milk needed for the coconut cream.
  7. Pour mixture into a deep baking dish or a large plastic container. I used a Tupperware-like rectangular pan, and it worked out perfectly. Place this in the freezer and set the timer for 45 minutes.
  8. Take the pan out of the freezer and stir or whisk the mixture vigorously or use a stick blender, breaking up any clumps. Place it back in the freezer. Repeat this step every 30 minutes, until the sherbet is frozen. The sherbet will be ready within 3 hours.
  • Freeze it right. Okay. Want to know what I did? Yes, this recipe incorporates David Lebovitz’s suggestions, but I actually didn’t stir the sherbet, after I placed it in the freezer. I wanted to see if it was even necessary. I have found that the texture is improved, when you whisk or blend the sherbet every 3o minutes; however, if this seems a little much for you, feel free to skip it. It still makes a great sherbet anyway!
  • Buy only organic. Always use organic citrus fruits, especially when incorporating zests.
  • Keep the zest! I apply a great tip from Local Kitchen on zesting. Anytime you have to juice or squeeze citrus, always zest your fruit before cutting it. Use any leftover zest and combine it with sea salt to make citrus-infused salts for seasoning. Here is the recipe.
  • Find the right coconut milk. Look for the cans of unprocessed and unsweetened coconut milk. Place a can in the refrigerator overnight, making sure to not disturb it. The next day, invert the can and open the top. The coconut cream will have separated from the water, and you can spoon it straight from the can! The Kitchn has a great breakdown of differences among canned coconut milk, coconut cream, boxed coconut milk, and coconut water.

close-up of sherbet two bowls of sherbet two bowls of blood orange sherbet with thyme sprigone bowl of blood orange sherbet with flowered towel

I have been researching wines for an upcoming series at the Kitchn on dessert wines, so I had a bottle of Moscato already open in the fridge. What a coincidence! It just so happens that sorbet and sherbet pair perfectly with this sweet, bubbly, low alcohol wine. And it’s absolutely perfect for brunch, since the alcohol sits comfortably around 8%. Steve and I have a tradition of starting a vacation off {a day off?} with a bottle of Moscato d’Asti, usually Michele Chiarlo’s “Nivole”. So, every time I open a bottle of this peachy nectar, I am reminded of vacations and taking it easy.

{Big thanks to my helpful wine colleagues, Sam Folsom, Bridget Witzell, and Steve Mason, for always keeping me in the loop, suggesting Mondavi, and keeping me stocked up!}

robert mondavi moscato d'oro


Robert Mondavi, Moscato d’Oro, Napa Valley, 2013


  • On the eyes  –  This lightly sparkling wine is a pale, golden straw color.
  • On the nose  –  You’ll immediately notice bright floral notes, with aromas of ripe peaches, and orange blossom. This wine will transport you to summer in an instant.
  • On the palate  –  It showcases notes of honeyed peach, lychee, and a serious mouthful of orange blossom. The acidity is medium in intensity and provides a refreshing contrast to the sweet style of this wine. Its gentle bubbles also pair well with the sweetness of the Moscato di Canelli grape.
  • On the table  –  I’d pair it with this blood orange sherbet, of course! The Moscato d’Oro would also go perfectly alongside a citrus semifreddo, a fruit tart topped with lemon curd, lemon meringue pie, a lemon olive oil cake, or a bowl of summer berries.
  • On the shelf  –  This bottle sits around $25 for a 375 mL {half-bottle} size.
  • On the ears  –  Of course, I paired it with some music. This album has been out since 2013, but I have recently gotten into it. And by “into it”, I mean playing the album on repeat a few times through. The Stroke’s Comedown Machine has gotten me out of a winter funk on a couple of occasions this year. I would definitely say the personality of this wine and dessert exemplifies the track, “One Way Trigger.”

If you are ever out in Napa Valley, visiting the Robert Mondavi Winery is an absolute must. It is a rite of passage for any wine lover. Mr. Mondavi revolutionized the wine industry in California and brought Napa Valley to worldwide acclaim. Plus, the facilities and property are just plain gorgeous. The barrel room is one of the most pristine examples I’ve seen. And the winery is more than happy to schedule a tasting and tour.

blood orange sherbet with moscato

For a decadent and easy treat, pour moscato over the blood orange sherbet.

I have to share some of the gems I’ve found from the internets on preserving and preparing blood oranges. At least pinning these recipes and dreaming about them has brightened up my week:

empty bowl of sherbet with spoonsI’ll close with a few Instagrams from the past week. One of my New Year’s goals was to start seriously studying calligraphy and hand-lettering. My foray into calligraphy has proven to be a challenging, yet incredibly fun, process with a very steep learning curve. Learning to ebb and flow with the pressure-release action of a calligrapher’s pen is not a task one perfects within a few months’ time. I have a great respect for letterers, who have mastered this graceful technique.

My original goal was to practice daily throughout the month of January, but I’ll continue to practice an hour a day, since I’ve basically established the habit. I am already seeing progress and have a better feel for the pen. I’ve also been dabbling with the medium of a digital pen to produce some fun hand-lettering pieces. The one below was prompted by a hand-lettering challenge, hosted by Miranti, of the blog and company, Pen and Peplum. Her work rocks, and her once-a-week challenge keeps me focused on my practicing.

What resolutions or intentions have been sticking for you?

Have you used the no-ice-cream-machine method for making sorbet, ice cream, or sherbet?

Do you have a recommendation for a machine?

And please send me a link to whatever citrus projects and recipes that have been inspiring you. As if I needed another excuse to go out and buy a bag of citrus!

Cheers!

Jayme

hand-lettered winter words

coconut + raspberry + spring peach freezer pops

Is it possible to still be jet lagged after a week of being back home? If not, I must be the exception to the rule. Last week, at this very moment, I was flying over Kansas, making my way back to Denver from the most memorable and exciting trip I think I have ever had. I spent a week in the Burgundy region of France and made the towns of Dijon and Mâcon my home for much too short of a visit. I ate, drank, photographed, walked, explored, documented, and relished all that France had to offer, during the limited time I was there.

The trip was thought-provoking, paradigm-shifting, life-changing…what else can I add to this train of hyphenated descriptors? Joking aside, I did come back changed. And not just circumstantially changed, as if change were a byproduct of my experiences. I was intentionally and purposefully changed. If you let it, travel can open your eyes to compelling sights, contrasting cultures, and different means of thought. It can also focus and open your eyes upon yourself: how you think in a completely different context, why you act the way you do, how you react when out of your element, who you truly want to be, and why you care so much about what people think. And why you deem others’ opinions so important.

As I sit here this late afternoon, poring over my notes and tweaking hundreds of photos, while the rain pitter-patters outside my window, I am reminding myself of how free I felt overseas. How alive and observant I became. How intensely focused upon my senses I was. Why do we so frequently become complacent in our daily lives and routines? Why is it that we so often need a big change or slap in the face to make us see things differently?

I didn’t speak French, save the seven or so pertinent phrases I taught myself on the flight over {thank you, SpeakEasy French app!}. Despite the language barrier, I let myself open up to chance, meeting interesting people along the way, finding myself in unfamiliar circumstances, and forcing myself to react the way I wanted to. I slowed my pace, I listened more, I tasted with intention, and, eventually, I sighed deeper than I’d sighed in months. I wanted to take this feeling home with me and perpetuate it. Live it.

Greeted with a severe case of exhaustion from a delayed flight, a lengthy layover and an immediate reentry to my job, I quickly, but temporarily, lost my post-vacation buzz. I am finally feeling more refreshed today. Memorial Day was filled with bustle for us. We visited the garden center and purchased replacement plants for our garden. A recent hail storm decimated most of our newly planted seedlings. We pouted for a short moment, dealt with our sense of no control, and chose to replant, even if it costs us a bit more money. What more can you do? The trip to the garden center revived our excitement, and we came home ready to fill the backyard with veggies and herbs.

All of that hard work made us thirsty for something sweet and refreshing. A quick peek on Instagram at Fork Knife Swoon‘s photo of creamy coconut and blood orange ice pops propelled me to the grocery to grab some fruit and make my own. These turned out pretty darned delicious and were super easy to create. Another lesson on taking the time to make and enjoy something beautiful and satisfying. Thank you, France, for the much-needed tutorial on those subjects.


Coconut + Raspberry + Spring Peach Freezer Pops


  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 peaches, sliced
  • 1 heaping cup raspberries
  • 1/8 cup agave nectar {sweeten to taste}

In a mixing bowl, whisk coconut milk, vanilla, and agave nectar until incorporated and creamy. Set aside. In a blender {I used my trusty Vitamix}, purée the sliced and pitted peaches until smooth. There is no need to remove the skins. Set the peach mixture aside. Separately purée the raspberries until smooth and set aside. I had to add a little water to the berries to get the action going. You may also use frozen fruit, if you do not have fresh fruit at your fingertips.

For a creamy freezer pop, as Laura suggests, combine all of the ingredients until incorporated and divide evenly into six molds. I chose to layer my three components for a striking presentation, but I think I will combine them all next time, for a smoother and less icy consistency. Evenly pour the coconut milk into the molds and place them in the freezer for 10 minutes. Slowly pour the peach mixture next, followed by the raspberry mixture. I used a chopstick to drag some of the color down to the bottom of the mold, where the coconut milk was resting. Freeze for another 30 minutes and then add the stick or top of the mold. After 4 more hours of freezing, my 6 pops were ready.

These fruity freezer pops turned out to be the most delicious part of our day, along with reviving our vegetable and herb garden. We eventually graduated to a more adult form of celebration and drove down to my favorite wine shop, Divino. We found a couple of gems, and cracked a bottle of Richard Betts’ newest wine, “My Essential” Rosé. Refreshing, crisp, and satisfying. It was an essential component to a very memorable Memorial Day.


Richard Betts’ “My Essential” Rosé, Grenache, Provence, France 2013


  • On the eyes – a delicate kiss of pale salmon.
  • On the nose – floral, freshly picked red berries.
  • On the palate – dry, crisp, lean, with racy acidity and balanced fruit.
  • On the table – enjoy alone or with a friend, in the garden or on the porch, with some chèvre or simply solo.
  • On the shelf – about $13.
  • On the ears – paired with Empire of the Sun’s “Alive” from their album, Ice on the Dune. This song seriously makes me happy and makes me feel, aptly, more alive. “Loving every minute, ’cause you make me feel so alive. Alive.” That’s pretty much how Memorial Day went down this year, with so much gratitude.