Tag Archives: juicing

cilantro-salted tomatillo green bloody marys | bittersweet seasons of change

I love the challenge of taking any vegetable in my garden – at any stage in its life cycle – and turning it into a cocktail. The abundant amount of sunny, 75-degree days kept me donning shorts, pouring the rosé, and harvesting all of the kale, chard, herbs, edible flowers, tomatoes, and tomatillos my garden would spit out, well into mid-November. We have had the most record-breaking, unseasonably warm weather this past month.

Before I share this {very} late fall recipe, I have to say a few things.

From putting in well over 55 hours each week at the restaurant, to observing the backlash of the recent election, to pursuing creative opportunities on the side, some of which I can’t even share with you yet, I have felt devoid of creativity and inspiration. I’ve had great difficulty writing and pouring creativity into this space here. Even when I do get strokes of genius or breaths of innovation, I’m all-too-tired to put action to paper, recipe, or photo. It’s been quite the challenging year for many of us, I feel.

For both me and Steve, we can safely say that 2016 has been the “Year of Change and Secrets.” That’s actually a soft and easy way of describing it. There have been countless highs and lows. Steve and I got engaged, which was wonderful, albeit stressful with respect to timing. We’ve gone through three different executive chefs at work, finally ending up with one of our former, beloved executive sous chefs at the helm. We’ve also lost two of our long-term managers and haven’t realllllly replaced them, so our workload has been more intense.

green garden bloody marys with tomatillos + late-season tomatoes | bittersweet seasons of change | holly & flora green garden bloody marys with tomatillos + late-season tomatoes | bittersweet seasons of change | holly & flora green garden bloody marys with tomatillos + late-season tomatoes | bittersweet seasons of change | holly & flora

And then there’s our side project, which we’ve been working on since April. Keeping it under wraps has been just as exhausting {and thrilling!} as all of the hours before and after work spent quietly building it. Once I can talk about it all, I’ll feel justified in my actions or, in some cases, the lack of them. For now, I simply seek out those moments, where I feel revitalized and recharged. It’s all I can do. I find them when I go for a long run, when I take a lengthy late-night drive, when I sit still in the darkness before the sun rises, and when I stay up late and watch the moon crest above my head.

Okay, I’ll be honest.

I don’t do all of the things I listed above every time I’m stressed. I want to do them, but many nights, it just doesn’t turn out like that. Take two nights ago, for example. I finished off a bottle of bubbles, impulsively booked two nights at a B&B I’d been dying to sneak away to, baked and consumed an entire pan of brownies, signed up for a marathon, and watched almost every Nora Ephron movie ever made. The next day suuuuuuuuuucked, and of course, I was needed at the restaurant to help Steve because he was having complications with his recent hand surgery.

And I couldn’t make it to the B&B.

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glow, baby, glow | cucumber, honeydew + kale shots from jules aron’s book, “zen and tonic”

Chocolate and peanut butter. Doughnuts and coffee. Netflix and pajamas. Rosé and poolside sunning. Gin and juice. There’s a strong theme going on here: perfect pairings. In fact, these are some of my personal, favorite pairings, especially the part where gin and juice come out to play. I love gin’s herbaceous, complex character, and it meshes so beautifully with botanicals, fruits, and fresh herbs. It’s the OG, garden-to-glass mixer, in my opinion.

I also make a green juice or smoothie on the daily. Pairing these two loves of mine – gin and green juice – is a natural fit. While I’m not suggesting enjoying these two things together first thing in the morning, I’m all for this combination by at least mid-afternoon. Mondays are a different story, though. Am I right? This combination of flavors is fiercely tempting me this particular morning.

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blood orange white wine cocktails with campari + thyme

There is nothing like the vibrant color, sweet burst of flavor, and juicy texture that an orange can deliver in the middle of winter, especially on those cold, grey days like the one we had here in Denver yesterday. I only made it outside once yesterday and just for a moment. I fully understand the necessity of this darker season as a time for inner growth and renewal within nature. Even though my backyard garden looks dead, brown, and crusty right now, there is actually life flowing within the roots of those perennial plants underneath the snow. They’re anticipating spring’s arrival, and they’re getting ready for it.

Steve and I have already started planning what we’re going to plant in the garden this spring. I’ve even ordered some seeds to start indoors in a few weeks. And I can’t wait for that first crocus to pop through the leaves, followed closely by the daffodils and tulips. We have been faithfully watering the spots where we planted tulip bulbs this past fall, along the circular walkway we recently built in the front yard. In our minds, spring has already sprung. Simply imagining the new growth puts a smile on our faces and a lilt in our steps.

I recently read that with respect to taking vacations, the act of anticipating the getaway is just as exciting as actually going on the vacation. The happiness factor is equal. One thing that Steve and I are trying to do more frequently is plan little getaways. Having something fun to look forward to is bringing the two of us closer as a couple and keeping us motivated through the tough or dull times.

blood orange wine cocktails with campari + thyme | holly & flora blood orange wine cocktails with campari + thyme | holly & flora

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strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | #popsicleweek

Happy Popsicle Week!

There are only a couple more days of this official celebration of all-things-frozen-and-delicious, hosted by the creative and affable, Billy of Wit & Vinegar. This is year two of his popsicle round-up, featuring a lineup of insanely creative recipes from bloggers across the interwebs. This exhaustive list will keep you inspired and glued to your popsicle mold well into early fall.

I’ve been making some sort of fruity popsicle, since I was five. I owe any popsicle prowess to my mom. She kept it simple and would freeze our Juicy Juice in the most adorable, kid-sized Tupperware molds. I wish I still had them. I’ve since moved on to a little more “involved” popsicle, adding whole fruits, coconut milk, nuts, and even edible flowers to the mix. This summer, however, was the first time I thought of adding a little extra kick: rosé!

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraAround our house, with two sommeliers in the kitchen, these boozy popsicles are affectionately known as “somm pops.” I think we’d imbibed a tad too much wine one evening, when we came up with the title. We ended up sketching plans for a recipe book, featuring popsicles made with wine, perfectly paired with their other ingredients. The next morning, the whole idea sounded ridiculous, but I’m still rocking their new name!

Keep in mind that booze doesn’t freeze as solidly as water or juice does. In fact, these particular pops melt kind of quickly, if you’re standing in the hot, summer sun. I wouldn’t decrease the amount of rosé in the recipe, however. The whole point is to enjoy a delicious, frozen, sangria-like concoction on a stick. I kept mine chilling in an iced wine bucket, and they didn’t melt as fast. You’ll notice a darker color at the top of these popsicles. I added a little blackberry liqueur, just before I froze the pops. I will most likely omit this on my next recipe, since the liqueur melted almost instantly. It made for a beautiful color, though.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora


strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | somm pops


  • 10 ounces dry rosé {I went with Lorenza rosé}
  • 7 ounces watermelon juice
  • 1 ounce blood orange liqueur {I used Solerno}
  • 1 ounce agave nectar
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 6-7 sliced strawberries
  1. Chill down your rosé, so you’ll have something to sip on, while you make your pops.
  2. Juice your watermelon. I used my Hurom juicer, but you can also simply blend watermelon chucks and then pour the juice through a fine-mesh strainer to remove any particulates.
  3. In a bowl, combine the rosé, the freshly juiced watermelon, orange liqueur, agave nectar, and lime juice. Whisk well to incorporate.
  4. Place two or three sliced strawberries into each popsicle mold and pour the rosé mixture on top, leaving about 1/4″ space at the top, so the liquid has room to expand.
  5. Add your popsicle sticks and freeze at least three hours or until solid.
  • This recipe makes ten popsicles. I used the Prepworks mold, sold on Amazon.
  • Remember, these are boooooozy pops, so they will melt faster. That’s not exactly a bad thing, when you want a light, summery buzz. You just have to enjoy them quicker.
  • Substitute any other berries you have on hand. Raspberries would be divine here.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraSo, I can’t leave out a tasting note on the Lorenza rosé. It has been one of my favorite pink wines this summer. In fact, I picked up an entire case, and I’m up for another one soon. Lorenza is crafted by a lovely mother and daughter duo, Melinda Kearney and Michèle Lorenza Ouellet. Their wine is crisp, dry, delicate, and delicious. The aromas and flavors in this rosé were a perfect match for the strawberries and watermelon in the popsicles.


lorenza rosé, california, 2014


  • On the eyes  –  It’s a brilliant, pale peach.
  • On the nose  –  Slightly under-ripened strawberry, quince, and pear, with light, floral aromas.
  • In the blend  –  44% Grenache, 33% Carignan, 15% Mourvèdre, 8% Cinsault.
  • On the palate  –  This rosé is dry and crisp with a racy, mouthwatering acidity. Lean and light in body, Lorenza still has an almost satin-like mouth-feel, supplied by the rich fruit on the palate. Lots of strawberries with a clean, mineral-driven, balanced finish. More, please.
  • On the table  –  I loved pairing this rosé with a watermelon caprese salad. The acidity in the wine was a perfect complement to the fresh mozzarella. Rosé isn’t only for delicate food presentations, either. Enjoy this wine with briny oysters, any summer salads, or, one of my favorites, a veggie burger with ample amounts of avocado.
  • On the shelf  –  Find it for around $19.

strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & flora strawberry + watermelon rosé popsicles | holly & floraWhat kind of popsicles are you making this summer? If you haven’t made any yet, here are a few other boozy pops I’m definitely going to try over the next few weeks. Whether you call them “poptails,” “cocktail pops,” or “somm pops,” get out and make yourself some!

I’ll add a little catch-up on the happenings from the garden this past week. It has been super hot and toasty with little rain, so I have had to water a little more frequently. No watering was necessary in June, but it is definitely the stereotypical summer now. Full-on heat and sunshine. And the new “secret garden” that we build along the side of our detached garage is seriously taking off. I’m so glad we turned a formerly fenced-in waste of space into an eye-catching and engaging edible growing area.

Happiest of weekends to you!

Jayme

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juiced spring berry + gin + rosé sangria | my post-birthday musings

It has been exactly one week, since I celebrated my birthday, and it was truly one of the most memorable celebrations. My boyfriend and I kept it super simple and decided to visit some of my favorite spots around the city of Denver. We started out at the Weathervane Café for some good coffee and shortbread, picked up the latest copy of Nourish magazine at Studio Colfax, scored five new albums at the record store, and had a hummus plate at Café Max. We drove back home and leisurely got ready for an early dinner at the famed farm-to-table restaurant, Fruition. The food was beautifully plated, exceptionally fresh, and perfectly coursed. Our sommelier, Aaron, even blinded us on the wine he chose, which we nailed almost perfectly: a 2001 Mersault-Genevrières.

That’s French for darn-good Chardonnay!

Earlier this week, I extended the birthday celebrations and treated myself to a cut and color. I decided to go for a more dramatic, asymmetrical shape, along with a series of copper and blonde highlights. I always enjoy going to the salon. It is like a getaway for me. I’m greeted with a big cup of coffee, and I basically have a two hour-long gab fest with my hair dresser, consisting of mutual confessions, some psychological counseling, and tear-inducing bouts of laughter. Aside from enjoying a glorious head massage during the shampoo session, I also indulge in my guilty pleasure of reading fashion magazines and catching up on the celebrity gossip in US Weekly or People. Sometimes, I even scan through an OK!, if I really want to know what’s going on. It’s the only time I break away from my usual Modern Farmer or Lucky Peach periodicals. rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora This time, I opted for the latest Harper’s Bazaar. It must have been the magazine’s “age issue” because in between all of those clothing and perfume ads, it was peppered with stories on what it means to age gracefully, how to dress age-appropriately, along with musings on the topic of aging from a few fashion icons. I have always admired the work of designer, Carolina Herrera, so when I came across a short article highlighting some of her thoughts on the topic, I dove right in. It was inspiring to hear that she actually started her successful business in her 40s. She affirmed my stance on growing older: I seriously believe we should all follow our passions, whenever we discover them, at whatever point we are in our lives. rosé berry sangria | holly & flora My aunt, Edith Jackson, is also one of my inspirations on the whole “getting older” topic. She has been a painter and designer for almost all of her life. Every morning, she greets her basement studio, nestled in the Smoky Mountains, with energy and creativity. She is actually the person who prompted me to start a blog. She even honed my social media skills and was one of the first to introduce me to Tumblr and Twitter. She makes every, single day count, educates me on current events, posts a snap of her sketchbook paintings each day on Instagram, cooks from scratch, has overcome breast cancer, and just recently opened her Etsy shop. Did I mention she is 70? We can either start living or stop living at any point in our lives. I, like my beloved aunt, am choosing to live with ferocity!


“You don’t have to be afraid of getting older; fear is the most disgusting thing. You have to get older because the alternative is horrible. If you don’t get older, you’re dead!”

Carolina Herrera


About that sangria. The word, sangria, actually translates as “blood” or “bleeding.” I know that doesn’t sound that appetizing, but there is a reason I am making this reference after posting my thoughts on living life with fierceness and purpose. Traditionally, sangria is made with brandy, fresh fruit, and red wine, hence the connection with the red-toned hue of blood. In many cultures, however, blood is symbolic of life and relates to living life with vigor, passion, intensity, and ferocity.

The recipe I am sharing is made with rosé wine and uses freshly juiced berries, apples, and lemons. Most sangria recipes toss fruit in as simply a garnish, not as a main component in the flavor profile. I recently became the proud owner of a Hurom HG Elite Slow Juicer, and I have already put it to use and made another sangria recipe, a juiced cucumber, melon, and white grape sangria. I justify consuming a couple of glasses of it because of all of the fruit servings I’m getting. It has to be healthy.


spring berry + gin + rosé sangria


  • 1 bottle of dry rosé {I like a rosé of Garnacha, like Las Rocas}
  • 6 ounces the Botanist gin
  • 4 ounces Leopold Bros. “American Orange” liqueur
  • 6 ounces berry juice {a good handful each of strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries}
  • 6 ounces apple juice {about 3 apples}
  • 1 ounce lemon juice {about 1 lemon}
  • 1 ounce agave nectar
  • soda water, for finishing
  • blackberry-studded ice cubes {see instructions below}
  • sliced strawberries or mint leaves, for garnish

Give yourself a day ahead to make and freeze your fruit cubes. You can juice the fruits and vegetables in advance, as well. That way, the juice has time to chill in the fridge.

  1. Juice the berries, apples, and lemon, following your manufacturer’s directions. Juice each separately, so you’ll know the exact amounts yielded.
  2. Combine the juices, bottle of rosé, gin, orange liqueur, and agave nectar, mixing well.
  3. Refrigerate mixture until ready to serve.
  4. Garnish cocktail or wine glasses with berry-studded ice cubes and pour juice mixture into each glass, saving a little room for a splash of soda.
  5. Toss a sprig of mint or a strawberry slice on each glass for a garnish.
  6. Don your sunnies, sit on the back porch {or fire escape or patch of grass}, and pour yourself and some friends a glass or two. There’s plenty to share.

rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora Even if you don’t have a juicer, you can still make this particular recipe with a blender. Just strain the blended fruit purée through a fine-mesh strainer or chinois for a less dense juice. I have used my Vitamix in this very fashion. If the final sangria is a little too thick for your liking, simply add more soda to the final mixture or perhaps a little white grape juice. You can even add water to the fruit mixture, to dilute it just after you blend it.


blackberry-studded ice cubes


  • 24 blackberries
  • filtered water
  • 2 ice cube trays {12 cubes each}
  1. If you want your blackberries suspended in the middle of the ice cubes, fill the slots halfway with water and drop the berries in. Let it freeze and then fill the slots all the way up with water {I didn’t do this here; I just tossed the berries into the slots, filled them with water, and froze the trays}.
  2. Freeze until solid.
  3. Use them, along with plain ice cubes, as an eye-catching and delicious garnish for the sangria.

You obviously can choose whatever berry you’d like. Just make sure you have enough ice for your sangria. Iced tea tastes better with, well, ice. The same rule applies to sangria.

IMG_2333 rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora rosé berry sangria | holly & flora There won’t be a shortage of rosé, since more and more producers are making it, due to its rise in popularity over the past few years. Personally, I have always been a pink wine supporter, but I am happy to share that love with all of the new-found rosé drinkers out there. Pink really is the new white. 😉 So, after you make a juiced rosé sangria, experiment with some other spring-inspired rosé sangria recipes. Here are a few of my favorites:

Do you have any favorite rosés that you’re already enjoying? I can’t get enough, so please let me know if you’ve had an amazing one. What is your favorite sangria recipe? Have you ever used freshly juiced fruit? What are your thoughts on getting older? Who keeps you inspired? Cheers to a freakishly amazing weekend! Jayme IMG_2342