pumpkin sugar scrub

IMG_1599

Almond pumpkin sugar scrub, made from freshly roasted pumpkin puree. This batch tastes so good that you almost want to eat it!

I am up rather late this evening, which seems to be a pattern as of late.  I have been rigorously studying the California Pinot Noirs and Cabernet Sauvignons on our wine list, so that I can rise to the occasion tomorrow, when I begin my position as sommelier at my new job.  I am scrunching my eyes, as I write this post, for I am finally getting a little closer to sleepy.  It has been difficult to find or make time to write, since the new job and the recent home renovations have taken priority.  All of my day-to-day actions have almost seemed “dreamlike” to me because of the fast pace that I am treading.  I am so ready to slow down…

It is all too important for us to take time to refresh and center ourselves, in the midst of change and perceived uncertainty.  Those are actually the times to be actively cherished!  When I feel my most unbalanced, nervously excited, and intensely energized, I usually am experiencing the most growth.  Transitions have the possibility to be profound and direction-changing, but they can also feel scary and stifling.  They can induce other feelings, as well.  I find that meditation, gentle yoga, and simply enjoying the basic details and rituals of my day let me relax enough to, for lack of better words, “go with the flow” in the midst of whatever is pushed my way.

CIMG8278

This cross between an Australian blue pumpkin and Hubbard squash was a sweet and delicate combination that made a wonderful pie base, pumpkin muffin starter, and aromatic sugar scrub. Thanks again, Trent!

I have made two batches of this pumpkin almond sugar scrub in the past two weeks, and its warm, spicy notes remind me of fall and nudge me to relax.  As I mentioned in an earlier post, I received several pumpkins and squashes from a dear friend.  I roasted and pureed them, and I ended up with about 11 cups of squash matter!  I have already made two pumpkin pies, a batch of pumpkin muffins, and two batches of this scrub!

IMG_1516

Freshly roasted pumpkin.

IMG_1518

I used a Cuisinart stick blender (thanks, Aunt Shir!) to process the roasted pumpkin. This tool is also great for pureeing soups and blending ingredients. Learn more about it here.

Making a sugar scrub is quite easy and only requires a few ingredients.  The basic recipe includes sugar, oil, and an essential oil of your choice.  You can always add exfoliants, such as coffee grounds or crushed seeds, to the mix.  Here is the recipe for this relaxing, sloughing pumpkin scrub:

IMG_1577

  • 1/2 cup almond oil (or coconut oil)
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin puree
  • 3 shakes clove essential oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • handful of crushed almonds
IMG_1564

The goods, waiting to be blended together.

This recipe is completely flexible.  I added a little extra oil to extend the scrub’s yield.  When I used coconut oil, the oil would harden, when exposed to cooler temperatures.  I really liked using the almond oil.  It is very emollient, and it does not have an intrusive aroma.  I added the almonds, so that they would destroy the dead skin on my feet.  You can forgo this ingredient, if you are planning on using the scrub on the rest of your body or tender areas.  Ground coffee beans also work well as an exfoliating additive.  I always advocate playing around with these “recipes”!  They are more like guidelines that are meant to be broken or expanded upon.

IMG_1587

I kept a few containers in the refrigerator, until I was ready to use them. They didn’t last that long in the shower! I am very excited to make some more, with my leftover pumpkin puree, and send them out as gifts this holiday season.

I hope you can use some leftover pumpkin puree or even some from the can to make a version of this aromatic, spicy scrub.  Let me know any versions that you have tried and loved.  Cheers!

2 thoughts on “pumpkin sugar scrub

  1. Pingback: detoxing from seasonal “pumpkin spice fatigue” | holly & flora

What do you have to say? I love your comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s